Scenarios

The following section includes three scenarios that provide examples of situations in which there are opportunities to act as an advocate. Each scenario contains a list of suggested action items and next steps with links to appropriate sections within the tool kit so that you can test your advocacy knowledge. Remember, each scenario provided is hypothetical, but may be similar to situations that may arise. Use the scenarios and action items as a guideline when planning your advocacy efforts.

Regardless of the actual situation, when determining how you will take action, keep in mind the following rules for effective advocacy:

  • Coordinate efforts with CBCN and other breast cancer advocates in your province and across the country
  • Be consistent and use the same messages
  • Be persistent and convincing
  • Be clear about your objectives; know what you are asking for
  • Follow-up and provide ongoing support

Scenario 1

Today, another provincial government (other than your own) held a press conference to announce an increase in breast cancer funding for underserved populations including young women and rural communities.

You have noted that in your province there is a lack of funding allocated to young women and rural communities for breast cancer programs and services. What can you do to advocate for the same funding for a program in your province?

Here are some next steps you could take action on to address this issue:

  • Write a letter to your MP that highlights the issue and concerns
  • Request a face-to-face meeting with your MP to discuss the issue
  • Contact your local media to request an interview to discuss the issue (only used as a last measure if you do not receive a response from your MP)
  • Contact CBCN with an update about your activities in order to coordinate efforts with other advocates across the country

Scenario 2

Today, Health Canada issued a Notice of Compliance (approval) for a new treatment for metastatic breast cancer. The medication is costly, with a course of treatment averaging $40,000.

You identify the need to advocate for access to this medication, to make it available to breast cancer patients as a life-saving treatment, through the provincial drug formulary. What can you do to advocate for access to treatment in your province?

Here are some next steps you could take action on to address this issue:

  • Write a letter to your MPP highlighting the issue
  • Request a face-to-face meeting with your local MPP to discuss the issue
  • Contact your local media to request an interview to discuss the issue (only used as a last measure if you do not receive a response from your MPP)
  • Contact CBCN with an update about your activities in order to coordinate efforts with other advocates across the country

Scenario 3

Yesterday, the federal government announced their budget. In the budget this year, there has been a change in the government’s health care priorities and breast cancer has been dropped as an area of focus. You note that this will result in a cut in funding for breast cancer support, programs and services from organizations like CBCN. This announcement spurred a number of media outlets to discuss the "over-funding" of breast cancer in the past few years.

From your own personal experience, you know how important CBCN is for breast cancer patients. What can you do to highlight the importance of this funding to breast cancer organizations?

Here are some next steps you could take action on to address this issue:

  • Write a letter to the editor in response to the article
  • Write a letter to the federal government highlighting the issue
  • Request a face-to-face meeting with your local MP to discuss the issue
  • Contact CBCN with an update about your activities in order to coordinate efforts with other advocates across the country
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Last updated: June 27, 2012